Sketchcasting

Here’s an interesting way to communicate concepts to students even after they’ve left your classroom.

Sketchcast.com is a site devoted to the creation and sharing of sketches, with or without audio. A great feature of this site is that each sketch you create is given an embed code, so you can attach it to your blog, wiki, or website. Share sample problems with students, record concept-mapping instructions, illustrate a lecture, and more.

Teachers with interactive tablets or SMART Boards will find this technology most accessible, but a successful sketch can be created with only a mouse. For the example below, I used my touchpad to demonstrate simple division.

[kml_flashembed movie="http://sketchcast.com/swf/player.swf?id=XNticq7" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

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2 Responses to Sketchcasting

  1. Megan Schacht says:

    I’m curious about this because of your comment about those with SMART Boards finding it most accessible. Is that just because the SMART Board is the tool in which you’d create sketches, diagrams etc to share with your students so having one makes it easier? I can’t wait to learn all about SMART Boards.

  2. Drew McAllister says:

    I think this sort of technology is most accessible to those with some sort of tablet or Smart Board because it is easier to recreate the process of a ‘typical’ paper and pencil sketch with those tools. “Drawing” with a mouse is sort of like attempting to write using a pool ball rather than a pen. Smart Boards and tablets have styluses that simulate the feel of a pen, and this facilitates the sketching process. They are definitely cool tools, and ones that can change how we approach our teaching.

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